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The Latin Tinge: Jazz and Latin American Music in New Orleans and Beyond

Adapted from Tulane University MUSC 3360

This course explores the relationship of African-American popular music and Latin American popular music, with a special focus on how New Orleans is a key site mediating these musical mixtures. It compares U.S. popular styles with styles from other countries in the hemisphere.

Dan Sharp

Assistant Professor - Music

Daniel Sharp is an Assistant Professor of ethnomusicology at Tulane University with a joint appointment in the Newcomb Department of Music and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

Course Chapters

  • About This Chapter

    (1829-1869) Over half a century before jazz pioneer Jelly Roll Morton argued the importance of “The Spanish Tinge” to jazz, Louis…

  • About This Chapter

    tresillo* x..x..x. habanera x..xx.x. cinquillo x.xx.xx. In 1938, folklorist Alan Lomax interviewed Jelly Roll Morton for the Library of Congress. At…

  • About This Chapter

    Musical circulations between Cuba, Mexico and New Orleans: danzón and jazz In contrast to understandings of the Spanish Tinge that follow…

  • About This Chapter

    Historian and archivist Bruce Raeburn digs deeply into the cultural origins of jazz, unearthing lots of details regarding how early jazz…

  • About This Chapter

    The tresillo, habanera and cinquillo rhythms contributed to the Spanish tinge in early jazz. Songs with these rhythms feature coexisting duple…

  • About This Chapter

    In Tenerife, a city in the Canary Islands, off the coast of Morocco, there is an ensemble named the Alabama Dixieland…

  • About This Chapter

    The Latin Tinge in New Orleans is not only a turn-of-the-20th century phenomenon that helped shaped the history of jazz. It…